Website of the Week: The Getty Research Institute

This week’s  Website of the Week, is the Getty Research Institute. “The Getty Research Institute is dedicated to furthering knowledge and advancing understanding of the visual arts and their various histories through its expertise, active collecting program, public programs, institutional collaborations, exhibitions, publications, digital services, and residential scholars programs. Its Research Library and Special Collections of rare materials and digital resources serve an international community of scholars and the interested public. The Institute’s activities and scholarly resources guide and sustain each other and together provide a unique environment for research, critical inquiry, and scholarly exchange.”

There is a huge wealth of resources and information in the many, many pages of the GRI, all concerned with the visual arts. The site is divided into several main areas all with vast collections of resources, meticulously catalogued and searchable.

Search Tools

 

 

Library

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Special Collections
Scholars Program

CILIP Carnegie Medal and Kate Greenaway Medal Celebrate Historic Milestones

The CILIP Carnegie and Kate Greenaway Medals are the UK’s oldest and most prestigious children’s book awards. Often described by authors and illustrators as ‘the one they want to win’ – they are the gold standard in children’s literature.

The CILIP Carnegie Medal is awarded by children’s librarians for an outstanding book written in English for children and young people.

The CILIP Kate Greenaway Medal is awarded by children’s librarians for an outstanding book in terms of illustration for children and young people.

View the Carnegie Medal Shortlisted Books Below:

View all the past Carnegie and Kate Greenaway Medal winners from the last 79 Years (2017 Winner still to be decided)

There are many other book awards run each year throughout the world for adult and children’s literature. Check out our Book Awards page below for more details.

Today is St. Patrick’s Day.

Today, March 17th is St. Patrick’s Day. So, just who was St. Patrick I hear you ask?

Saint Patrick is the patron saint and national apostle of Ireland. St Patrick is credited with bringing christianity to Ireland. Most of what is known about him comes from his two works; the Confessio, a spiritual autobiography, and his Epistola, a denunciation of British mistreatment of Irish christians. Saint Patrick described himself as a “most humble-minded man, pouring forth a continuous paean of thanks to his Maker for having chosen him as the instrument whereby multitudes who had worshipped idols and unclean things had become the people of God.”

Many folk ask the question ‘Why is the Shamrock the National Flower of Ireland ?’ The reason is that St. Patrick used it to explain the Holy Trinity to the pagans. Saint Patrick is believed to have been born in the late fourth century, and is often confused with Palladius, a bishop who was sent by Pope Celestine in 431 to be the first bishop to the Irish believers in Christ.

Saint Patrick is most known for driving the snakes from Ireland. It is true there are no snakes in Ireland, but there probably never have been – the island was separated from the rest of the continent at the end of the Ice Age. As in many old pagan religions, serpent symbols were common and often worshipped. Driving the snakes from Ireland was probably symbolic of putting an end to that pagan practice. While not the first to bring christianity to Ireland, it is Patrick who is said to have encountered the Druids at Tara and abolished their pagan rites. The story holds that he converted the warrior chiefs and princes, baptizing them and thousands of their subjects in the “Holy Wells” that still bear this name.

There are several accounts of Saint Patrick’s death. One says that Patrick died at Saul, Downpatrick, Ireland, on March 17, 460 A.D. His jawbone was preserved in a silver shrine and was often requested in times of childbirth, epileptic fits, and as a preservative against the “evil eye.” Another account says that St. Patrick ended his days at Glastonbury, England and was buried there. The Chapel of St. Patrick still exists as part of Glastonbury Abbey. Today, many Catholic places of worship all around the world are named after St. Patrick, including cathedrals in New York and Dublin.

People with Irish heritage the world over celebrate St. Patrick’s Day today, March 17. Some calculations place the total population of people with predominantly Irish ancestry at over 100 million people. That’s over 15 times the current population of Ireland which stood at 6.4 million in 2011. At last count (2011 Australian Census) there were over 2 million Australians reporting Irish Ancestry; that’s just over 10% of the total population and of this number a little over 12% were first generation Irish immigrants to Australia.

 

Read St. Patrick in his own words here.

The Irish Diaspora: Global Irish Site and Wikipedia Article. Also Irish Times article on current Irish emmigration.

Year 10 GCSE Drama Trip to London

Le Régent students hit the London streets in search of theatre.

Last week Miss Carter, Miss Severis and Mr Bull led a group of Year 10 Drama students on a fantastic excursion to London to experience live theatre. All students completing the GCSE Drama course are required to attend a specified number of hours of live theatre performance each year. To this end the College arranged an amazing 4 day trip to the UK capital to see and respond to three diverse plays as well as sampling the delights of the National Theatre behind the scenes tour and Shakespeare’s Globe Theatre at Bankside.

After the excellent National Theatre Tour and Globe Exhibition it was off to the Cambridge Theatre for the musical adaptation of Roald Dahl’s Matilda.  Adapted for the stage by Dennis Kelly, with songs written by Australia’s premier musical comedian Tim Minchin and a production from the Royal Shakespeare Company it was bound to be no less than amazing.

On the Saturday morning it was down to work for the students, completing their write-ups of the previous evening’s wonderful performance and preparing for the big day ahead. A matinée performance of the stage adaptation of Mark Haddon’s The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time at the Geilgud Theatre was followed by a superlative rendition of The Woman in Black from Susan Hill‘s novel, at The Fortune Theatre, Covent Garden.

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While the Curious Incident was a masterclass in combining superb acting with truly impressive Physical Theatre and innovative set design, The Woman in Black made for a very uneasy night walking back to the hotel in the dark….

All in all a truly enjoyable and successful Drama trip. Cannot wait till next year!

Year 10s Develop EBSCO Search Skills and Create Email Search Alerts

Today, our Year 10 students further developed their understanding of how to search our EBSCOhost databases using advanced search techniques. They also created email search alerts to begin bringing high quality research results directly into their inbox. To view the video tutorials click below:

Find the EBSCO database links below:

EBSCO 

(Huge collection of newspaper, magazine and journal articles, maps, videos)

Points of View (Both sides of Controversial Issues)

Usual usernames and password apply.

 

World Book Day 2017 at Le Régent College

This Year marks the 20th anniversary of World Book Day in the UK. As a British International School we rightly celebrate this exciting event on the first Thursday in March and join thousands of other schools in the Uk and around the world to celebrate books and reading. Take a brief tour of the fabulous World Book Day Costumes of our students and staff.

Best dress-up prizes were awarded to Samuel, Year 3, Oriana, Year 8, and Leila, Year 1.

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Although not dressing up, Senior students did not miss out as they pitted their literary knowledge against each other in the WBD Big Book Quiz.

Check out these fabulous World Book Day links for inspiring information and activities.

via World Book Day | Official site of the yearly event. Introduces the day, lists events, and lists book recommendations. Also pictures of past events.

http://www.bookaid.org/support-us/world-book-day/

 

World Book Day 2017 this Thursday!

This Year marks the 20th anniversary of World Book Day in the UK. As usual there are thousands of events and celebrations of books and reading throughout the UK and other parts of the world. As a British International School we rightly celebrate this exciting event on the first Thursday in March.

wbd-2016
World Book Day at Le Régent College 2016

At Le Régent College Junior School students and staff are encouraged to dress up as their favourite fictional character or author. There will be great prizes for best dressed student and even a staff prize.

Let’s see if we can make it even better in this 20th anniversary year.

Although not dressing up, Senior students will not miss out as they pit their literary knowledge against each other in the WBD Big Book Quiz, Thursday Lunchtime in the Dining Room, from 1.25pm!

Check out these fabulous World Book Day links for inspiring information and activities.

via World Book Day | Official site of the yearly event. Introduces the day, lists events, and lists book recommendations. Also pictures of past events.

http://www.bookaid.org/support-us/world-book-day/

 

Year 10 Students Unravel Plagiarism and the Harvard Referencing System.

Today, Year 10 pupils investigated the perils of plagiarism and got to grips with referencing using the Harvard style. Part 1 of  a 2 part series began preparing them for the rigours of GCSE essays and the IB Extended Essay.

image by Ryan Roberts
image by Ryan Roberts

For a host of Harvard (and other) referencing tips and resources visit our Referencing Page here.